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Word of the Day - Hoary

Commonly Confused Words Part 3

Q MarkIt's time for another edition of Commonly Confused Words!

Prophecy vs. Prophesy

I see these two confused in New Age and Christian books, as well as paranormal fiction.

Prophecy: Pronounced proffa-SEE, prophecy is a noun. It's the message a prophet declares.

Nancy heard the prophecy about the apocalypse from the oracle in the woods.

Prophesy: Pronounced proffa-SYE, prophesy is a verb. It's the act of giving a prophecy.

In the middle of the woods, Nancy heard the oracle prophesy at the top of her lungs.

Callus vs. Callous

Callus: Noun. Hardened or thickened area on the skin.

The farmer had a callus on his thumb.

Callous: Adjective. Indifferent, hardened, unsympathetic.

The teacher's treatment of the grieving student was callous. 

Advise vs. Advice

Advise: Verb. To offer counsel. (ad-VIZE)

"I advise you to stay silent", said the lawyer.

Advice: Noun. Opinion or recommendation. (ad-VICE)

You want my advice? Walk away.

Feel vs. Fill

Feel: Verb. Awareness of touch. To have a sensation.

I feel ill.

Fill: Verb. To make full.

Allow me to fill your glass with water.

Site vs. Sight

Site: Noun. Position or location. Or, short for website.

The construction site is on the north end of the campus.

Sight: Noun. Vision. Act of seeing.

Boy, are you a sight for sore eyes!

Horde vs. Hoard

Horde: Noun. A group or swarm.

Stella was chased by a horde of bees.

Hoard: Verb. To stockpile.

What a packrat! She hoards every piece of junk she can find.

Hoard: Noun. A guarded supply.

The dragon guarded her hoard of jewels. 

Secrete vs. Secret 

Secrete: Verb. To discharge by secretion. (sa-KREET)

The pimple secreted yellow pus.

Secrete: Verb. To conceal. (sa-KREET)

The dog secreted dozens of bones in the back yard.

Secret: Noun. A mystery. Something hidden. (SEE-krit)

Tom has a secret and he's not telling.

Secret: Adjective. Secluded, sheltered, withdrawn. Done without the knowledge of others. (SEE-krit)

The superhero lived in a secret location.

i.e. vs. e.g.

i.e. Latin id est. That is. (Interchangeable with in other words).

The lead singer of Iron Maiden is a gorgeous renaissance man (i.e., Bruce Dickinson).

e.g. Latin exempli gratia. For example.

I love 80s metal bands (e.g. Iron Maiden, Scorpions, Judas Priest).

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